True Doctrine For Our Children

Reading: “Teaching True Doctrine,” Henry B. Eyring, Liahona, April 2009

If you have read this blog you know I have given a lot of thought to how to best teach my child(ren) the gospel.  I feel greatly the responsibility to teach my daughter the gospel, and I have seen consequnces that come from failing to do so.  I want our family united together in the gospel.

Sometimes, though, I feel silly talking to my 13 month old about gospel topics.  She can’t even talk yet, so it feels silly to say things to her like “God loves you,” or “God made the animals” and other such kid-sized doctrine.  Sometimes it seems like it would be better to just spend time together, or to do fun things to keep our relationship good.

In this talk, though, Elder Eyring assures that we should talk to our children about doctrine.  He says,

The question should not be whether we are too tired to prepare to teach doctrine or whether it would be better to draw a child closer by just having fun or whether the child is beginning to think that we preach too much. The question must be, “With so little time and so few opportunities, what words of doctrine from me will fortify them against the attacks on their faith which are sure to come?” The words you speak today may be the ones they remember. And today will soon be gone.

Even though my daughter cannot talk, she certainly can understand many of the things I say to her, even if she doesn’t understand the individual words. Why else do I talk to her so much about things during the day, like eating lunch or staying with me while we are out?

Talking to my daughter about the gospel also helps me get into a habit of teaching her true doctrine, so that when she is ready to listen I feel comfortable and ready to talk.

Today I am going to talk to my daughter about a gospel topic, even if I feel a little bit silly.

How do you teach your children the gospel?  Or, how will you teach your children about the gospel?  How can you teach them in a way they will understand?

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